YOUR ATTITUDE DETERMINES EVERYTHING

JANUARY 10
 
 My servant Caleb has a different attitude, and has wholeheartedly followed me.(Numbers 14:24, Berkeley)
 
Caleb went against the crowd and popular opinion. While the majority thought the giants were too big and God’s people were too small, Caleb never doubted God for a minute. The miracles proved that nothing was too big for God to handle. The manna proved He cared and that every need would be supplied. So with a God like this, how can you fail?
 

Listen: “Caleb stilled the people before Moses, and said, Let us go up at once, and possess it; for we are well able to overcome it” (Numbers 13:30). What an attitude! If only they’d listened. But no; their negative attitude landed them in the wilderness-for forty years! Doubt and unbelief will always lead you into the wilderness. Grumbling and complaining will fill your life with barrenness. John Mason says, “It’s your attitude that determines your altitude. You’ll never rise any higher than it.” Caleb had a different attitude and look at the results he got: “Hebron therefore became the inheritance of Caleb … because that he wholly followed the Lord God of Israel” (Joshua 14:13).   HOW’s YOUR ATTITUDE AND YOUR OUTLOOK TODAY?  

​Several days ago as I left a meeting at our church, I desperately gave myself a personal TSA pat down. I was looking for my keys. They were not in my pockets. A quick search in the meeting room revealed nothing. Suddenly I realized that I must have left them in the car. Frantically I headed for the parking lot.
 
My wife, Diane, has scolded me many times for leaving the keys in the ignition. My theory is the ignition is the best place not to lose them. Her theory is that the car will be stolen. As I burst through the doors of the church, I came to a terrifying conclusion: her theory was right. The parking lot was empty. I immediately called the police. I gave them my location, confessing that I had left my keys in the car and that it had been stolen.
 
Then I made the most difficult call of all. “Honey,” I stammered. I always call her “honey” in times like these. “I left my keys in the car, and it has been stolen.”
 

There was a period of silence. I thought the call had been dropped, but then I heard Diane’s voice. “Ken,” she barked, “I dropped you off!”

Now it was my time to be silent. Embarrassed, I said, “Well, come and get me.”
 

Diane retorted, “I will, as soon as I convince this policeman I have not stolen your car!”